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More than 24 hours in a day in postgreSQL

Assuming I have this schema:

create table rental (
    id           integer,
    rental_date  timestamp,
    customer_id  smallint,
    return_date  timestamp,
);

Running this query returns strange results:

select customer_id, avg(return_date - rental_date) as "avg"
from rental
group by customer_id
order by "avg" DESC

It displays:

customer_id|avg_rent_duration     |
-----------|----------------------|
        315|     6 days 14:13:22.5|
        187|5 days 34:58:38.571428|
        321|5 days 32:56:32.727273|
        539|5 days 31:39:57.272727|
        436|       5 days 31:09:46|
        532|5 days 30:59:34.838709|
        427|       5 days 29:27:05|
        555|5 days 26:48:35.294118|
...

599 rows

Why is there values like 5 days 34:58:38, 5 days 32:56:32 and so on? I thought there where only 24 hours in a day, maybe I’m wrong.

EDIT

Demo here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!17/caa7a/1/0

Sample data:

insert into rental (rental_date, customer_id, return_date)
values
('2007-01-02 13:10:06', 1, '2007-01-03 01:01:01'),
('2007-01-02 01:01:01', 1, '2007-01-09 15:10:06'),
('2007-01-10 22:10:06', 1, '2007-01-11 01:01:01'),
('2007-01-30 01:01:01', 1, '2007-02-03 22:10:06');

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Answer

You have to adjust interval with justify_interval() function:

select customer_id, justify_interval(avg(return_date - rental_date)) as "avg"
from rental
group by customer_id
order by "avg" DESC;

See official doc:

Adjust interval using justify_days and justify_hours, with additional sign adjustments

Still, it does not explains why the result of the operation is that weird without using justify_interval() (in other words, why we have to apply this function)

Note: thanks to @a_horse_with_no_name for their comment

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